#1August 28th, 2012 · 03:57 AM
370 threads / 187 songs
3,343 posts
United Kingdom
Reverb Tutorial
Watch his Pro on how he uses different reverbs in the best way possible

#2August 28th, 2012 · 04:22 AM
117 threads / 27 songs
1,057 posts
Germany
Nice demonstration and explanation of rev types.
One can feel lost when trying out all these possibilities of revs, delays etc.
When I started with recordings couple of yrs back I spent days with playing around with the effects of my Yamaha multitracker. Same with the Boss git-multi-effect.
Inspirative, but also time robbing.
#3August 30th, 2012 · 02:24 AM
155 threads / 29 songs
1,929 posts
United States of America
The more I mix and record/learn.. the less use of effects is needed.  subtle is the key word.  i also tend to not use to many different types of verbs or delays withing a song or mix,, it can make the mix unbalanced.. like the instruments are not in the same room, or part of the same idea.... there are always exceptions though.
#4August 30th, 2012 · 07:53 AM
370 threads / 187 songs
3,343 posts
United Kingdom
toastedgoat wrote…
The more I mix and record/learn.. the less use of effects is needed.  subtle is the key word.  i also tend to not use to many different types of verbs or delays withing a song or mix,, it can make the mix unbalanced.. like the instruments are not in the same room, or part of the same idea.... there are always exceptions though.
Same for me, when started out used far too much reverb, the only time I'd use too much reverb is to create a particular effect in a part of a song, for instance you may want a guitar to sound like it's coming from far away.
I now concentrate on the source, then you don't have to rely on plugins to try and fix it, which can only improve the original by little, hence the sound source quality/EQ/sound is the key.
#5August 30th, 2012 · 10:34 AM
185 threads / 27 songs
2,769 posts
Germany
Using of FX is also a contemporary issue. You can follow the records through the decades of the last century. in the 40s and 50s you had a plate reverb (made of gold), found in almost every serious studio, in the sixties you had more and more tape technologies for echoes and delays. In the 70s first electronic reverbs came up, flangers, phasers, filters. The 80s where full of reverb, sometimes really colorful. The 90s started with more electronic fx gear and first samples - memory phase shifting - first 8bit digital stuff. Today's spirit is to reduce the fx to a minimum, like Denis said. But you can find dance and minimal and such stuff full of samples and pseudo arps based on a delay fx with up to 48bit technology.

And what you can hear is that today's vocals have some reverb on it but it's very very subtle just to fill up some quiet parts. Mostly they're completely dry.

...it's also a contemporary issue
#6August 30th, 2012 · 10:14 PM
155 threads / 29 songs
1,929 posts
United States of America
TritonKeyboarder wrote…
Using of FX is also a contemporary issue. You can follow the records through the decades of the last century. in the 40s and 50s you had a plate reverb (made of gold), found in almost every serious studio, in the sixties you had more and more tape technologies for echoes and delays. In the 70s first electronic reverbs came up, flangers, phasers, filters. The 80s where full of reverb, sometimes really colorful. The 90s started with more electronic fx gear and first samples - memory phase shifting - first 8bit digital stuff. Today's spirit is to reduce the fx to a minimum, like Denis said. But you can find dance and minimal and such stuff full of samples and pseudo arps based on a delay fx with up to 48bit technology.

And what you can hear is that today's vocals have some reverb on it but it's very very subtle just to fill up some quiet parts. Mostly they're completely dry.

...it's also a contemporary issue

what quite a few mixing engineers do is ramp the reverb tail out of the mix at the end of  the phrase, or any stops, so you don't hear the reverb ring on. then like stated very subtle usage is common. I listen to bands like Whitesnake from the 80's.. liked their tunes, I also thought the production was very good on the albums.  One thing though compared to today.. there is a ton of effects on almost everything.  So it now sounds strange to me to hear all the verbs and delays going on.
#7April 8th, 2016 · 03:06 AM
155 threads / 29 songs
1,929 posts
United States of America
If  reverb is washing out your mix. try using a long predelay 80ms or longer (got this tip from Chris Lord Alge)
#8April 8th, 2016 · 09:58 AM
370 threads / 187 songs
3,343 posts
United Kingdom
toastedgoat wrote…
If  reverb is washing out your mix. try using a long predelay 80ms or longer (got this tip from Chris Lord Alge)
Lexicom PCM reverb plugins are great for keeping the sound clear in the mix, quite expensive plug in though, but I think they have brought the price down.
I saw a YouTube Logic Pro X reverb tutorial, where he only used the wet signal to add to the reverb, this makes sence as you already have the dry signal in place, the dry sound is not coloured in any way, plus it saves on your resources.
#9June 3rd, 2017 · 08:01 PM
155 threads / 29 songs
1,929 posts
United States of America
toastedgoat wrote…
TritonKeyboarder wrote…
Using of FX is also a contemporary issue. You can follow the records through the decades of the last century. in the 40s and 50s you had a plate reverb (made of gold), found in almost every serious studio, in the sixties you had more and more tape technologies for echoes and delays. In the 70s first electronic reverbs came up, flangers, phasers, filters. The 80s where full of reverb, sometimes really colorful. The 90s started with more electronic fx gear and first samples - memory phase shifting - first 8bit digital stuff. Today's spirit is to reduce the fx to a minimum, like Denis said. But you can find dance and minimal and such stuff full of samples and pseudo arps based on a delay fx with up to 48bit technology.

And what you can hear is that today's vocals have some reverb on it but it's very very subtle just to fill up some quiet parts. Mostly they're completely dry.

...it's also a contemporary issue

what quite a few mixing engineers do is ramp the reverb tail out of the mix at the end of  the phrase, or any stops, so you don't hear the reverb ring on. then like stated very subtle usage is common. I listen to bands like Whitesnake from the 80's.. liked their tunes, I also thought the production was very good on the albums.  One thing though compared to today.. there is a ton of effects on almost everything.  So it now sounds strange to me to hear all the verbs and delays going on.
I found out how they ramp the verbs and delays using sidechain compression/expander, or automation.  It's quite cool how it works.
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