#1November 20th, 2006 · 12:56 PM
131 threads / 114 songs
295 posts
United Kingdom
Fixing the crack... lol
Yea some of you posted about getting a crack sound at the start or end of your samples you have loaded into your sequencer, we'll i spoke to my music production tutor about it, and he said it could be a few things.

The first and IMO the most likely is that the samples have been sliced badly... when u look at a sample zoomed out, it might look like ur slicing it in a point of no sound, but your most likely not... lets look at this in a screenshot of a sample zoomed in...



as you can see point B would be the correct place to slice it, so then it would match up with the start of the sample, and opoint a... would be the wrong place to slice it, because that means the loop ending would not match up with the start, thus resulting in a single crackle sound everytime the loop repeats as it skips the distance of the redline below point A... to summarise... Slicing at point B good... slicing at point A bad...

The next point he said it could be, would be the soundcard drivers, try updating them, if that doesn't work try older versions as newer versions aren't necessarily the best.

And the other point he made was that it could be the actual soundcard, this would natrually be more relevant for ppl using laptops with built in soundcards/chips which are designed for playing mp3's in Windows Media Player etc, and not really... industry standard equipment... so my only solution for this one would be to sell a kidney and go buy a new soundcard, either way, i hope one of these provides a solution for your sliced sample crackle problems... if not... tough... 

-D

P.s. Please dont really try and sell your kidney for soundcard money... that would just be silly...
#2November 20th, 2006 · 03:50 PM
340 threads / 59 songs
4,344 posts
United Kingdom
I believe that 'Point B' would officially be called 'Zero-Crossing' in most musical software. And most musical software has a choice to "snap to Zero Crossing".
I've just noticed that Audacity and WaveLab both use the 'Z' key to do this.
It is the point where there is 'no sound' on the left or right channel and if done as Devo has explained you should have points of 'no sound' at the beginning and end of your sample.

I must have done well, I got a sound card and an optical cable for my last kidney 
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