#1August 19th, 2005 · 07:33 PM
1 threads
2 posts
United States of America
Tablature Software
Well, Im new here, like just joined a few minutes ago, but Ive been playing guitar for quite a while now, so that makes me cool right? Well anywho, Ive been trying to write a few songs that require two guitars playing at once. Now I can play each part individually and they sound just fine, but I cant tell how they sound together being played at the same time without someone else here playing with me. And thats kind of a hassle teaching someone my song, then planning a day to get together and play, especailly when my schedule is normally very busy. I was wondering if anyone knew of any free or cheap tablature programs that let you listen to your creation without it sounding like some synth machine from the 80's. Not that theres anything wrong with the 80's, just I would like it to sound like an actual guitar that has heavy distortion on it. All the programs I have tried sound more like a keyboard then an instument with strings. And I realise that pianos and whatnot have strings, but Im talking about the electric ones. Anyways, any help you can offered would be greatly appreciated.
#2August 19th, 2005 · 08:34 PM
6 threads / 3 songs
26 posts
United States of America
well, if youre on here, you most likely are trying to record songs...sooooo...just record one part, and then you can hear it however you like.  no need to tab it out, just record and play along with yourself.  that way you can have it exactly the way you want, and not have to mess with some program to tab it out.
#3August 20th, 2005 · 05:22 PM
31 threads / 1 songs
434 posts
United States of America
i suggest two things... one, learning to read real music... and two... using that knowlege to work with a MIDI sequencer

though I agree with nicu24 and I think you should just record yourself and play along with it
#4August 21st, 2005 · 06:49 AM
1 threads
2 posts
United States of America
Yeah, I feel kind of stupid not having thought to do that before. Its a great idea though and I plan do try it out. Also, I am learning to read "real" music, just at an extremely slow pace.
#5August 21st, 2005 · 07:25 AM
31 threads / 1 songs
434 posts
United States of America
ok... good, well that's the way it goes

Honestly, I'm a f8cking amazing musician if I do say so myself, but I absolutely suck at reading music. Oh, I can read it, I know all the technical details, I'm just not very fast.

I learned how to read music at a young age but I've never practiced and so if I find myself needing to read a peice of music it will take me at least a couple minutes to figure out the melody and then about twice as long to figure out any written chords. Usually however I just cheat, and figure out the resultant harmony from the melody and I invent my own chords jazz comp style

Interestingly, as my skill as a musician has increased and as my experiential knowlege of the musical territory has expanded, my ability to read music has increased in a corresponding manner. The more songs I've taught myself and the more melodies I've transcribed and the more music I've written and the more people I've played with - so too more and more does reading music make that much more sense. It really is a tool, it's a form of written expression not unlike these greek/roman/arabic symbols with which write our posts. You probably remember learning to read and write as a kid, but I can guarantee that the vast majority of us first learned to speak and that a good number of us found the learning of reading and writing to be a rather difficult task compared to simply speaking.

Learning to read and write music is no different. Before you can really appreciate (key word being appreciate as opposed to understand or use) the beauty of the written form you must first be fluent in the spoken dialect of the language. This is not to say you should not learn the reading and writing of it early on, in fact that is the best way to approach it - but simply be aware that your ability to read and write it doesn't dictate how well you can speak it, and speaking it is ultimately what really matters. Your ability to read and write will increase correspondingly with your ability to speak, they are after all, both forms of language and as your linguistic ability increases in one area, so too will it increase your ability in other areas. Obviously this doesn't mean that you'll become an amazing sight reader without practice in sight reading, but it does mean that just playing will actually help.

The point that I'm trying to make is that your circumstance is normal and nothing to be shy of. I'd wager to bet that a good portion of finely talented musicians in this world neither read nor care to read standard musical notation. It is, however, a good tool to have and use and over time you will cultivate it up to a point where its use benefits you. So keep going and don't pay attention to whether it's hard or not. It will get easier.
#6January 29th, 2006 · 11:49 AM
7 posts
United Kingdom
I KNOW THE ANSWER!!!!
Lollage

Hokey poky so this is a tad expensive but seriously once you have it.. you will fall in love with it cos it is the best thing since sliced bread!

Its called G7. Its a branch on software called Sibelius. Its really really cool.
Basically its a "rock" version of the Sibelius software and comes with loads and loads of different instruments (drums, guitars, bass, you name it its got it!). Then what you do is start a new page and it gives you the stave you want and you just program the notes it.
Its really cool because you can either program tab or normal music stuff.. and if you don't know either you can just do it from what it sounds like.

Oh yea and the G7 packages comes with a Kontakt Player which basically just makes the sounds really really realistic.

i know it sounds a bit complecated but trust me... its not.
Its made my musical life soooo much easier.

Oh yea and once you have composed a song, you can convert it into an audio track so you can still post it if you want to!

If i have some time this week i will post one of the songs i have composed using it so you can hear what the sound is like.
ohh or click this link which is where i post my coursework songs-
http://g7music.net/cgi-bin/show_score.pl?scoreid=69567
(if it asked you to install something called scorch say yes... its completely safe.. promise)

ok i have babbled a bit... its just.. yea G7 really is the best thing since sliced bread... specially if you don't play a lot of instruments because you can still compose and hear what you have composed parts for different instruments without ever having to play them

ciao xxx
#7February 13th, 2006 · 01:01 PM
117 threads / 55 songs
1,540 posts
Chile
Just try with Guitar Pro 4. Make your own tabs, then you can add pianos, synths, bass, drums, and about 80 more instruments for your choice.
Try it.
 
      > Iszil
#8February 13th, 2006 · 04:39 PM
42 threads / 1 songs
556 posts
United States of America
All I can say is what Entheon did; learn to read reall music, and record it. Not that difficult.
#9February 13th, 2006 · 06:19 PM
117 threads / 55 songs
1,540 posts
Chile
But first start with something easy.

     > Iszil
#10February 19th, 2006 · 04:50 AM
7 posts
United Kingdom
g7 is way easier to use then guitar pro :P
#11February 28th, 2006 · 09:10 AM
54 threads / 29 songs
1,552 posts
United Kingdom
Not tried g7, but I do have guitar pro 4.  It's ok, but the printed music is a bit naff!  I've found that "Power Tab" is my software of choice for printing tabs.

However, most of the time I tend not to rely on other people's interpretation of how something is played.  I've found that it seems to be ok to listen to a song loads of times so I know it really well, and then work out the chords/solos for myself.   I have used Guitar Pro and Power Tab when I've got stuck, especially with solos.

That said, if you want to write your own stuff and then print the guitar tabs it's going to be a pretty slow process unless you have a midi guitar and use a program that writes the score for you.  If you play a keyboard, then there's a good chance this is midi compatible, so the job's easy for you.  Guitar Pro allows you to import a midi file with no problem, and will print the score (although see my comment above!).

I think that this over-complicates what you want to do.  If you just want to hear what the two guitar parts sound like together, then download some free PC recording software like Krystal; record one guitar, then record the other over the first in a separate track. 

It's what Nicu24 said in the first place............. DUH!

Link for Power Tab http://www.power-tab.net/downloads.php
Link for Krystal http://www.kreatives.org/kristal/index.php?section=download

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